SAT / ACT Prep Online Guides and Tips

Transition Questions on ACT English: Strategies and Practice

Posted by Alex Heimbach | Jul 24, 2015 4:00:00 PM

ACT English

Transitions are one of the most common and trickiest rhetorical topics tested on the ACT English section. However, there are a couple simple rules that can make answering these questions much easier.

 In this post, I'll cover everything you need to know to approach all three types of transition question:

  • Types of transitional relationships
  • Transitions between sentences
  • Transitions between clauses
  • Transitions between paragraphs
  • Key strategies for transitions on ACT English questions
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The 8 Most Common Mistakes You Make on ACT English

Posted by Alex Heimbach | Jul 24, 2015 9:00:00 AM

ACT English

Over the past five years, I've tutored dozens of students on the ACT and seen them miss the same types of questions over and over again. The ACT English section really only tests a handful of concepts, so it's easy to make the same exact mistake on three or four questions—which really hurts your score.

Don't worry, though! I've come up with eight simple rules you can follow to help you avoid the most common problems on the ACT English and automatically raise your score 1-2 points. Use my ACT English strategies and practice on a lot of realistic questions, and you'll raise your English score.

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Macro Logic in ACT English: Sentence and Paragraph Order

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jul 22, 2015 5:19:41 PM

ACT English

Macro logic questions on ACT English ask you to determine where to properly place sentences within a paragraph and where to properly place paragraphs within a passage. These rhetorical skills questions test your ability to analyze sentences and determine how to most logically organize a passage. Knowing how to recognize and using my top ACT English strategies to approach these questions will enable you to correctly answer them in an efficient manner.

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Author Main Goal: ACT English Questions

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jul 12, 2015 1:00:00 PM

ACT English

Generally, ACT English tests two things: grammar and reading comprehension. Author main goal is a specific type of reading comprehension question that appears frequently on the ACT. Having a systematic approach to correctly answer these questions will boost your score and help you maximize your limited time to complete the ACT English section. Read this article for a thorough explanation of and guidance on how to figure out author main goal questions. 

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Run-on Sentences and Fragments in ACT English: Grammar Rule

Posted by Mary Ann Barge | Jul 11, 2015 12:33:04 AM

ACT English

You may think that of all the grammatical concepts you will encounter on the ACT English, recognizing a correct sentence will be one of the easiest ones. But did you know that this is actually one of the most commonly-tested subjects because it can be very tricky?

Do you know what you need to have in order to have a complete sentence? Can you reliably tell the difference between a subordinate clause and an independent clause? Do you know how to use semicolons and conjunctive adverbs?

Read this guide to see how the ACT manages to trick so many students with this seemingly easy concept.

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Relative Pronouns on ACT English: Tips and Practice

Posted by Alex Heimbach | Jul 3, 2015 9:00:00 AM

ACT English

Relative pronouns tend to inspire a lot of confusion. Is it the boy who cried wolf or the boy whom cried wolf? All's well that ends well or all's well which ends well? 

As much as we may think we need the fancier pronouns, like whom and which, more often than not, the ones we're more familiar with are just fine. In both of those cases, the first version of the saying is the correct one.

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How Often Is NO CHANGE the Right Answer on ACT English?

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jul 1, 2015 1:00:00 PM

ACT English

On the ACT English section, in the majority of questions, the first answer choice is “NO CHANGE." The “NO CHANGE” answer choice indicates that the underlined word or phrase is correct. Sometimes, students are hesitant to select “NO CHANGE” because they think that there should be an error.

In this article, I’ll explore the frequency of correct “NO CHANGE” answers to give you an idea of how often the “NO CHANGE” answer will be the right one. Furthermore, I’ll let you know how to use this information.

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Author Technique on ACT English: Passage Strategy

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jul 1, 2015 7:30:00 AM

ACT English

 

Author technique is a specific type of reading comprehension question that appears frequently on the ACT English section. Author technique questions require you to analyze a specific sentence and determine if it fulfills an author's stated purpose.

Read this article for a thorough explanation of author technique and guidance on how to figure out author technique questions.

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Adjectives vs Adverbs for ACT English: Grammar Rule

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jun 30, 2015 11:52:49 PM

ACT English

You may recall the good ol’ days of elementary school when you learned about adjectives and adverbs. If you had realized that you would have to know about these parts of speech for the ACT, perhaps you would have paid better attention instead of daydreaming about Nickelodeon and The Disney Channel. Don’t worry. If you’ve forgotten or never learned about these parts of speech, I’ll teach you everything you need to know about them for the ACT English section.

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Parallel Structure for ACT English: Grammar Rule

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jun 26, 2015 11:50:58 PM

ACT English

Parallel structure is a grammar rule that is often referenced yet often misunderstood. After reading this article, you’ll comprehend parallel structure and be able to correctly answer ACT English questions that test your knowledge of parallel structure.

Because you will most likely see parallel structure questions on the ACT, let’s learn this rule and raise your ACT English score.

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Pronoun Agreement on ACT English: Tips and Practice

Posted by Alex Heimbach | Jun 22, 2015 4:00:00 PM

SAT Writing, ACT English

Pronoun agreement errors are an especially confusing type of ACT English question because people often misuse pronouns, especially when you speak. In fact, I just made a pronoun mistake: can you spot it?

Take a closer look at the second half of my first sentence: "people often misuse pronouns, especially when you speak." Who is "you" referring to here: "people." However, the correct pronoun for the third person plural is "they." The correct version of the sentence is "people often misuse pronouns, especially when they speak."

On the ACT English section, you'll be expected to spot these kind of errors in a variety of different contexts. I'll go over both the basic rules for pronouns and the common mistakes you'll see on the test, so that you can approach the test with confidence.

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Wordiness and Redundancy in ACT English: Tips and Practice

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jun 22, 2015 1:00:00 PM

ACT English

ACT English tests you on a number of specific grammar rules. Being able to understand and apply these rules will help you maximize your ACT English score. Besides knowing specific grammar rules, there are some general strategies to keep in mind that will help you correctly answer more questions. 

One of these tips is that the ACT prefers shorter sentences. Wordiness and redundancy are common errors on the ACT English section. The goal for each sentence is to express the same information in the shortest grammatically correct way.

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Complete Parts of Speech for SAT Writing and ACT English

Posted by Mary Ann Barge | Jun 21, 2015 7:25:22 PM

SAT Writing, ACT English

“Parts of speech” is a fancy way of saying that every word in the English language can be put into one of eight categories, depending on how it is used. Of these eight parts of speech, only 7 are tested on the Writing SAT and on ACT English. 

Understanding the different parts of speech is absolutely essential to having a firm grasp of English grammar, and in succeeding on the SAT and ACT. Unfortunately, nowadays many schools no longer focus on teaching this type of grammar.

Are you a bit unsure about what, exactly, a preposition is, or can’t tell the difference between an adjective and adverb? Feeling a bit rusty after learning this years ago? This article will provide the foundational information you need before moving on to more complex grammatical concepts. I'll also go over a few important SAT/ACT grammar rules.

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Pronoun Case on ACT English: Tips and Practice Questions

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jun 14, 2015 5:30:00 PM

ACT English

Pronoun case is a grammar rule that tends to be broken by most English speakers. Perhaps of more concern to you, questions that test your knowledge of pronoun case often appear on the ACT. Master this rule and you’ll be one step closer to mastering the ACT English section.

There are multiple pronoun rules that are tested in ACT English. This one is relatively straightforward and tends to be tested less often than ambiguous antecedents or pronoun antecedent agreement. However, if you are aiming for that 30+ score, you should be ready if you encounter a pronoun case question.
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All the ACT Idioms You Need: Complete List

Posted by Justin Berkman | Jun 14, 2015 11:00:00 AM

ACT English

 

Idiom questions on the ACT are different from the other grammar questions on the ACT. Why? Idiom questions don’t conform to specific rules. You have to rely on your intuitive grasp of English and your familiarity with certain phrases.

Because you’re likely to encounter at least a few idiom questions on the ACT English test, I’ll provide you with some information about idioms that should help you raise your ACT English score.

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