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How Many Questions Can You Miss for a Perfect SAT Score?

Posted by Dora Seigel | Sep 12, 2015 10:30:00 PM

SAT/ACT Score Target, SAT General Info

 

body_perfect.png

Every year about 500 students get a perfect score on the SAT. How many questions can you get wrong and still be among this elite group? Find out here in a complete breakdown of the Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing sections across 4 official SAT practice tests.

 

How Is the SAT Scored?

To understand how many questions you can get wrong and still achieve a perfect 1600, you need to understand how the test is scored. I'll give a brief summary here, but if you're interested in more details about the scoring process, check out our guide to how to calculate SAT score.

For the whole test, you receive 1 point for correct answers, and you receive 0 points for a wrong answer and questions skipped. Since you’re not penalized for wrong answers, skipping or answering a question incorrectly results in the same score. NOTE: the essay is not factored into your composite SAT score (400-1600 scale), so I will not discuss it further in this article. However, for more information on the new SAT essay, read our other guide.  

To calculate your Math section, you start by calculating a raw score, which is simply the number of questions answered correctly (if you answered 50 correctly, your raw score is 50).

For the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section, you start by calculating 2 raw scores: one for the Reading portion and one for the Writing and Language portion. Just as in the Math section, the raw scores are just the number of questions answered correctly.

For both sections, each raw score is then converted into a scaled score — the exact conversion varies by test date. However, the College Board provides this example chart in their SAT practice test as an estimate:

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Let's go through how the scoring works for each section in a bit more depth. For Math, the raw to scale score conversion is very simple. Let’s say you miss 2 questions (you got 56 correct out of 58 questions); your raw score will be a 56. You then find the corresponding scaled score for Math on the chart, which is 790. Your Math section score would be a 790.

For Evidence-Based Reading and Writing, the conversion is a little more complicated since you get 2 raw scores. If you missed 3 questions in reading (got 49 of 52 correct), your raw score would be 49. If you missed 10 questions in writing (got 34 of 44 correct), your raw score would be 34. You then find the corresponding scaled score for each of those sections:

Reading - 49 questions right - 38 scaled score

Writing - 34 questions right - 32 scaled score

Next, you add together the 2 separate scaled scores and multiply by 10 to get your Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section score.

(38 + 32) x 10

= 70 x 10

=700

Your Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section score would be 700. Now let’s get back to the original question:

 

Exactly How Many Questions Can You Get Wrong/Skip and Get 1600?

Since the scores on the individual sections are simply added together to create your composite SAT score, you need to score 800 on the 2 sections (Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing) to get 1600.

In the chart below, I have analyzed 4 new SAT score charts and determined the number of questions you can get wrong or skip on each part of the test for an 800 in the section. NOTE: since you’re not penalized for wrong answers, skipping or answering a question incorrectly results in the same score: 

 Section

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Math

0

0

0

1

Reading

1

0

1

0

Writing

0

0

0

0

 

Typically, to get 800 in Math, you cannot get any questions wrong and/or cannot skip any questions because you need to get a raw score of 58 (out of 58 questions). Occasionally, an SAT will allow you to get 1 wrong or to skip 1 in Math as you can see on Test 4. However, I would NOT count on that, as it is not the norm. If you're aiming for 1600, strive for perfection in Math.

To get 800 in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing, you cannot get any wrong nor skip any on the Writing and Reading portions. Occasionally, an SAT will allow you to get 1 wrong or to skip 1 on the Reading portion as you can see on Test 1 and 3. However, do not count on that as it is not the norm. If you're aiming for 1600, prepare to get 0 wrong and skip 0 in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing.

Overall, on the SAT, you should aim to get no questions wrong and not skip any questions. This is no easy feat, but it is possible. After all, about 500 students do it each year!

 

What Does This Mean If You're Trying to Get 1600?

You need to make sure that you can finish the entire test in the allotted time since you cannot afford to skip or miss any questions.

For Math, you need to be basically perfect. You can see, through my analysis, on three out of four Math sections, you cannot get any wrong nor miss any if you want 800.  

For Evidence-Based Reading and Writing, you also need to be basically perfect. On two out of four Reading portions, you could get one wrong or skip one and still get 800, but you can’t rely on having that opportunity. On Writing, you cannot get any wrong nor skip any.  

 

What's Next?

Trying to get a perfect score? You should check out our SAT study guide.

Taking the test in the next month and need to improve your score in a hurry? Read our cramming guide.

Aiming for the Ivy League? Read our guide to getting in!

 

Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points? We have the industry's leading SAT prep program. Built by Harvard grads and SAT full scorers, the program learns your strengths and weaknesses through advanced statistics, then customizes your prep program to you so you get the most effective prep possible.

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Dora Seigel
About the Author

As an SAT/ACT tutor, Dora has guided many students to test prep success. She loves watching students succeed and is committed to helping you get there. Dora received a full-tuition merit based scholarship to University of Southern California. She graduated magna cum laude and scored in the 99th percentile on the ACT. She is also passionate about acting, writing, and photography.



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