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Complete List: Open Admission Colleges With 100% Admission

Posted by Justin Berkman | Nov 21, 2015 10:00:00 PM

College Info

 

If you’re worried about getting into college, maybe I can ease your worries a bit. There are open admission colleges (aka open enrollment colleges), colleges that offer admission to all students provided that they have a high school diploma or GED. Regardless of your GPA or standardized test scores, you can have the opportunity to pursue a college degree at one of these schools.

In this article, I will define open admission colleges, explain the pros and cons of attending a college with open admissions, and provide you with a list of four-year colleges with a 100% acceptance rate.

 

What Is an Open Admission College?

Open admission, or open enrollment, means that everybody who has a high school diploma or GED can attend. Nobody is rejected. Open admission schools have an acceptance rate of 100%. Generally, you don’t have to take the SAT or ACT to be admitted, but most open admission colleges require placement tests.

 

Types of Colleges That Are Open Admission

There are public, private independent, private liberal arts, and private religious colleges that are open admissionExamples of public open admission colleges include UTEP, Metropolitan State, and Weber State. The University of Pikeville is an open admission liberal arts college. Arlington Baptist College and Jarvis Christian College are open admission religious colleges.

Also, some colleges with open enrollment, including Baker College and Dixie State University offer both associate (2-year) and bachelor's (4-year) degrees. Furthermore, some open admission universities offer distance or online education.

The majority of community colleges are open admission. At a community college, you can get a trade certificate, an associate degree, or transfer to a 4-year college to get your bachelor's degree.

 

 

Community Colleges (2-Year) vs. Open Admission Colleges (4-Year)

Although most community colleges and all 4-year open admission universities accept anyone who applies, there are still some major differences between the two types of programs. Most importantly, the bachelor’s degree you receive from a 4-year college is a more advanced degree and will provide more job opportunities than the associate degree you receive from a 2-year college. Nonetheless, each type of school has its own benefits. Let's go through them.

 

Benefits of Attending a Community College

Even though 4-year colleges tend to be more highly regarded than community colleges, community colleges do offer some advantages.

 

Lower Cost

Most community colleges are a fraction of the price of 4-year colleges. According to the College Board, the average cost of tuition and fees for 2012-2013 at a two-year school was only $3,131, just over one-third of the cost for a year at a four-year public institution. 

 

You Can Transfer to a Four-Year College

Community colleges offer you the opportunity to transfer to a 4-year college and get a bachelor’s degree. In fact, many public 4-year colleges offer guaranteed admission to in-state community college students if they fulfill certain requirements.

Some of my former students attended community college and were able to transfer to prestigious colleges like UC-Berkeley and UCSD.

 

Many Community Colleges Offer Certificates in Specific Trades

Whereas 4-year colleges tend to offer degrees in more academic or scholarly fields, most community colleges offer certificates in trades that directly lead to employment. The majority of certificate programs can be completed in less than a year. Common certificate fields of study include health care, cosmetology, auto mechanics, and computer and information services.

 

You can get a cosmetology certificate at a community college. (COD Newsroom/Flickr)

 

Benefits of Attending a Four-Year College

Besides the increased opportunities and higher income you're likely to receive if you get a bachelor's degree vs. an associate degree, there are additional benefits of attending a 4-year college right out of high school.

 

You're More Likely To Get a Bachelor's Degree

Students are more likely to get a bachelor’s degree if they start their post-high school education at a 4-year college. In my experience, only the most motivated students who attended community college ended up transferring and receiving bachelor’s degrees.

While everyone at a 4-year college is pursuing a bachelor’s degree, many community college students aren’t. You have to be more driven and fulfill all the necessary requirements to transfer to a 4-year college.

 

Better Social Life

Four-year colleges tend to offer better social lives for their students. Many community college students only spend time on campus when they’re in class. The average age of community college students is older; there are many part-time students and older people who are trying to continue their educations.

At four-year colleges, even those where the majority of students don’t live on campus, there are usually more extracurricular activities and out-of-class interaction between students.

 

Takes Less Time To Get a Bachelor's Degree

On average, it takes longer for a community college student to receive a bachelor’s degree than it does for a student who starts at a 4-year college. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the average time it takes to complete a bachelor’s degree is:

  • 71 months for students who begin at 2‐year colleges
  • 55 months for students who begin at 4-year public colleges
  • 50 months for students who begin at 4-year private colleges

The lower cost of community colleges might be offset by the additional time it could take to receive a bachelor’s degree.

 

 

Open Admission vs. More Selective Colleges

 You may end up deciding between an open enrollment college and a more selective college when you're making your college decision. I'll break down the advantages of each type of institution.

 

Benefits of Open Admission Colleges

Because of the lower admission requirements at colleges with open admissions, it may be easier to excel in more demanding subjects at an open admission college because you’re likely competing with fewer gifted students, and you may be able to maintain a higher GPA. A higher college GPA can increase your chances of gaining admission to graduate or professional schools and getting certain jobs after you graduate from college.

Also, the cost of open admission colleges, especially public open admission colleges, is usually lower than those of more selective institutions. Even when comparing private colleges, colleges with open enrollment tend to be cheaper than more selective schools.

The tuition and fees for Jarvis Christian College, a private Christian college with open enrollment in Hawkins, Texas is $11,839. That's significantly cheaper than the $41,560 tuition and fees for Rice University, a selective private school in Houston, Texas. For comparison, the tuition and fees for Texas A&M, a public university, is $9,428 for in-state students and $28,021 for out-of-state students.

Lastly, open admission colleges offer you the opportunity to be around more diverse types of students. Open enrollment colleges typically enroll many more older students and part-time students who might have full-time jobs or families. More selective colleges tend to be composed mostly of students who did well in high school and attended college right after graduating high school. Part of the education you receive in college comes from being around different types of people who have different backgrounds and perspectives.

 

You can save money by attending an open admission college. (Images Money/Flickr) 

 

Benefits of More Selective Colleges

Often, schools are judged based on their acceptance rates. Schools with higher acceptance rates tend to have worse reputations than more selective colleges. While you can accomplish your academic and professional goals by studying at any college, it can be more difficult to get certain jobs or admitted to more selective graduate school programs from a less prestigious university.

More selective colleges often have a higher caliber of student. In college, you learn from and are inspired by your peers. More selective schools have a greater percentage of driven students with advanced academic skills.

Lastly, more selective schools typically have more resources. Because they have more resources, more selective schools often have better dorms, academic facilities, and more prestigious professors.

 

List of Open Admission Colleges

All of the colleges on the list are 4-year colleges with 100% acceptance rates. I put the public colleges are in bold.

Besides these colleges, there are a number of colleges that are close to open admission. They have acceptance rates of between 97% and 99.9%. Assuming you meet minimum requirements, you’ll almost definitely gain admission. Check out our list of schools with the highest acceptance rates.

Some seminaries and schools of religious teaching, like yeshivas and rabbinical colleges, are also open admission, but I didn't include them in this list.

Alabama

School City State
Columbia Southern University Orange Beach AL
Heritage Christian University Florence AL 

 

California

School City State
Academy of Art University San Francisco CA
Coleman University San Diego CA
Life Pacific College San Dimas CA
National University La Jolla CA
Northwestern Polytechnic University Fremont CA

 

Connecticut

School City State
Holy Apostles College and Seminary Cromwell CT

 

District of Columbia

School City State
University of the Potomac Washington DC

 

Idaho

School City State
Boise Bible College Boise ID
Lewis-Clark State College Lewiston ID

 

Kentucky

School City State
University of Pikeville Pikeville KY

 

Massachusetts

School City State
Boston Architectural College Boston MA

 

Maryland

School City State
University of Maryland University College Adelphi MD

 

Michigan

School City State
Baker College of Auburn Hills Auburn Hills MI
Baker College of Cadillac Cadillac MI
Baker College of Clinton Township Clinton Township MI
Baker College of Flint Flint MI
Baker College of Jackson Jackson MI
Baker College of Muskegon Muskegon MI
Baker College of Owosso Owosso MI
Baker College of Port Huron Port Huron MI

 

Minnesota

School City State
Metropolitan State University St. Paul MN

 

Missouri

School City State
Missouri Western State University St. Joseph MO
Harris-Stowe State University St. Louis MO

 

Nebraska

School City State
Wayne State College Wayne NE

 

New Hampshire

School City  State
Granite State College Concord NH

 

New Mexico

School City State
New Mexico Highlands University Las Vegas NM
Santa Fe University of Art and Design Santa Fe NM
Western New Mexico University Silver City NM

 

New York

School City State
Medgar Evers College Brooklyn NY

 

Ohio

School City State
Ohio University Southern Ironton OH

 

Oklahoma

School City State
Cameron University Lawton OK
Oklahoma Panhandle State University Goodwell OK

 

Texas

School City State
Arlington Baptist College Arlington TX
Fisher More College Fort Worth TX
University of Texas at El Paso El Paso TX
Jarvis Christian College Hawkins TX

 

Utah

School City State
Dixie State College St. George UT
Utah Valley University Orem UT
Weber State University Ogden UT

 

Washington

School City State
City University of Seattle Bellevue WA

 

 

 

What's Next?

As you're going through the college application and selection process, make sure that you're researching colleges to make sure you attend the best college for you. Figure out whether you should go to a rural, urban, or suburban college.

If you're concerned about college costs, check out these 79 colleges with full ride scholarships.

 

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Justin Berkman
About the Author

Justin has extensive experience teaching SAT prep and guiding high school students through the college admissions and selection process. He is firmly committed to improving equity in education and helping students to reach their educational goals. Justin received an athletic scholarship for gymnastics at Stanford University and graduated with a BA in American Studies.



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