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Historical SAT Percentiles: New SAT 2016 and 2017

Posted by Laura Staffaroni | Jan 29, 2018 12:00:00 PM

SAT General Info

 

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If you took the new SAT in 2016 and 2017, you might be wondering what percentile your score is in. Is a 700 on Math in 2016 the same as a 700 in Math in 2017? How much do percentile scores change from year to year?

In this article, I'll explain what new SAT percentile scores are and how they've changed over time. I'll also provide percentiles for SAT combined and section scores for 2016 and 2017.

 

What Are SAT Percentile Scores?

Your SAT percentile score tells you how well you did compared to other students who took the SAT. If you scored in the 97th percentile, then you scored higher than 97% of the people who took the test. If you scored in the 50th percentile, you did better than 50% of the people who took the test.

Every year, the College Board determines that year's SAT percentile scores based on how college-bound high school seniors that year scored on the SAT. The higher the percentile your SAT score is in, the better you scored compared to other high school seniors.

 

Special Note: Nationally Representative Sample Percentiles vs. SAT User Percentiles

On your score report, you'll see information about two different kinds of percentiles: Nationally Representative Sample Percentiles and SAT User Percentiles. For this article, when we talk about percentiles we'll be exclusively referring to SAT User Percentiles, which are based on only actual SAT scores of students in the class of 2017 who took the new SAT. Read this article to find out more about the differences between the two percentile types on your SAT score report.

 

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Do Percentile Scores Change?

In the past, SAT scores stayed pretty much at the same percentile, year over year. For instance, on the old SAT, a score of 1880 was in the 87th percentile for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015.

That SAT percentile scores haven't changed much over time is intentional—the whole idea behind the SAT scoring system is that colleges can know that a student who got a 1880 SAT score in 2010 performed about the same as a student who got a 1880 SAT score in 2006 or 2015. If an 1880 was in the 80th percentile in 2010 and the 95th percentile in 2015, the scores would be meaningless for comparison purposes on their own.

Because the SAT in its current format has only been administered for a couple of years, however, new SAT scores aren't quite as tied to specific percentiles. As an example, a 1310 new SAT score was in the 87th percentile in 2016 and in the 89th percentile in 2017.

The biggest differences changes in percentiles on the new SAT happened for students who scored between 860 and 1200, with the same score differing by as many as six percentile points between 2016 and 2017 (for instance, a 950 was in the 25th percentile in 2016 and 31st percentile in 2017). As the new SAT is administered to more students over more years, these differences will no doubt shrink, making it easier to compare the same scores. For now, though, if you're scoring in the 860-1200 range, you can expect the percentile of your score to shift by up to six percentile points compared to past years.

 

How Should You Use This Info and Why Does It Matter?

Because the same SAT scores have had such varying percentiles in the last couple of years, your percentile score is the easiest way to figure out how well you did on the SAT. If you scored higher than 50 percent of test-takers, then you're above average; if you scored higher than 75 percent of test-takers, then you did very well indeed.

When you apply to college, however, you're not being compared to all students who took the SAT, but to all students who took the SAT and are applying to that school. To help students figure out how they stack up against past successful applicants, colleges usually publicly post 25th and 75th percentile scores of admitted students. If you want to be a competitive candidate for a school, your target SAT score should be around or above a school's 75th percentile score.

On a section level, percentiles can help you put your scores in context. It might seem like you're doing about equally well on Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Math if you get a 690 on ERW and a 640 on Math. However, a 690 ERW score is in the 94th percentile, while a 640 Math score is in the 84th percentile. Raising each section score by 100 points would raise your Math percentile ranking by 13 points and your ERW percentile ranking by only 5+ points. If you're thinking about retaking the SAT and trying to figure out where you should focus your studying efforts, your percentile scores can help identify how you can improve the most.

Finally, percentile scores also tell us that a small increase in your composite score can have a large impact on your percentile score, particularly if you're scoring around or even a little below the middle of the pack. For instance, in 2017 an SAT score of 1050 was at the 47th percentile, but a score of 1200 was at the 76th. Increasing your score by just 160 points can take your score from below average to the top quarter of all SAT scores.

 

Composite Score Percentiles, 2017–2016

SAT Composite Score 2017 Percentile 2016 Percentile
1600 99+ 99+
1590 99+ 99+
1580 99+ 99+
1570 99+ 99+
1560 99+ 99+
1550 99+ 99+
1540 99+ 99
1530 99+ 99
1520 99 99
1510 99 99
1500 99 98
1490 99 98
1480 99 98
1470 98 98
1460 98 97
1450 98 97
1440 97 96
1430 97 96
1420 96 95
1410 96 95
1400 95 94
1390 95 94
1380 94 93
1370 94 92
1360 93 91
1350 92 91
1340 91 90
1330 90 89
1320 90 88
1310 89 87
1300 88 86
1290 87 85
1280 86 83
1270 85 82
1260 83 81
1250 82 80
1240 81 78
1230 80 77
1220 78 76
1210 77 74
1200 76 72
1190 74 71
1180 73 69
1170 71 67
1160 69 65
1150 68 64
1140 66 62
1130 64 60
1120 63 58
1110 61 57
1100 59 55
1090 57 52
1080 55 50
1070 53 48
1060 51 46
1050 49 44
1040 47 42
1030 45 40
1020 43 38
1010 41 36
1000 40 34
990 38 32
980 36 30
970 34 29
960 32 27
950 31 25
940 29 24
930 27 22
920 26 20
910 24 19
900 22 18
890 21 16
880 19 15
870 18 14
860 17 13
850 15 12
840 14 11
830 13 10
820 12 9
810 11 8
800 9 7
790 8 7
780 8 6
770 7 5
760 6 4
750 5 4
740 4 3
730 4 3
720 3 2
710 3 2
700 2 2
690 2 2
680 1 1
670 1 1
660 1 1
650 1 1
640 1 1-
630 1- 1-
620 1- 1-
610 1- 1-
600 1- 1-
590 1- 1-
580 1- 1-
570 1- 1-
560 1- 1-
550 1- 1-
540 1- 1-
530 1- 1-
520 1- 1-
510 1- 1-
500 1- 1-
490 1- 1-
480 1- 1-
470 1- 1-
460 1- 1-
450 1- 1-
440 1- 1-
430 1- 1-
420 1- 1-
410 1- 1-
400 1- 1-

 


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Section Score Percentiles

Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

Score 2017 Percentile 2016 Percentile
800 99+ 99+
790 99+ 99+
780 99+ 99+
770 99+ 99
760 99 99
750 99 99
740 98 98
730 98 97
720 97 96
710 96 95
700 95 94
690 94 92
680 92 91
670 91 89
660 89 86
650 87 84
640 85 81
630 82 78
620 79 75
610 77 72
600 73 69
590 70 66
580 67 63
570 64 60
560 60 56
550 57 52
540 53 49
530 49 45
520 46 42
510 42 38
500 39 35
490 35 31
480 32 28
470 28 25
460 25 22
450 22 20
440 19 17
430 16 15
420 14 13
410 12 11
400 10 9
390 8 7
380 6 6
370 5 5
360 4 3
350 3 3
340 2 2
330 1 1
320 1 1
310 1 1
300 1 1-
290 1- 1-
280 1- 1-
270 1- 1-
260 1- 1-
250 1- 1-
240 1- 1-
230 1- 1-
220 1- 1-
210 1- 1-
200 1- 1-

 

 

Math

Score 2017 Percentile 2016 Percentile
800 99+ 99+
790 99 99
780 99 98
770 99 98
760 98 98
750 97 97
740 97 96
730 96 95
720 95 95
710 94 94
700 94 92
690 92 91
680 91 89
670 89 88
660 88 87
650 86 86
640 84 83
630 82 81
620 81 79
610 78 76
600 76 73
590 73 70
580 70 67
570 67 64
560 65 60
550 61 57
540 58 53
530 54 49
520 49 45
510 45 40
500 40 34
490 37 30
480 34 27
470 32 24
460 29 21
450 25 18
440 22 16
430 20 14
420 17 12
410 14 10
400 12 8
390 10 7
380 8 5
370 7 4
360 5 3
350 4 3
340 3 2
330 2 1
320 1 1
310 1 1
300 1 1
290 1- 1-
280 1- 1-
270 1- 1-
260 1- 1-
250 1- 1-
240 1- 1-
230 1- 1-
220 1- 1-
210 1- 1-
200 1- 1-

 

 

What's Next?

How do you compare to other students in your state? Find out with our regularly updated list of average SAT scores by state.

Where does your SAT essay score fit into all this? Learn more about SAT essay scoring and what the average SAT essay score is here.

Would you be able to score in a higher percentile on the ACT? We help you figure out if the ACT or SAT is a better test for you with this foolproof method

 

Disappointed with your scores? Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points? We've written a guide about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now:

Get Sample Lesson

 

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Laura Staffaroni
About the Author

Laura graduated magna cum laude from Wellesley College with a BA in Music and Psychology, and earned a Master's degree in Composition from the Longy School of Music of Bard College. She scored 99 percentile scores on the SAT and GRE and loves advising students on how to excel in high school.



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