SAT / ACT Prep Online Guides and Tips

What Is Zorvolex? Uses, Dosage, and Side Effects

Posted by Hannah Muniz | Oct 31, 2017 1:30:00 PM

Health

 

feature_hands_pills

Are you taking Zorvolex? Or are you simply looking to learn more about the medication? Regardless, we’ve got answers for you. In this guide, we explain all of the most important facts to know about Zorvolex, starting with what it's used for and what its dosages are. We then go over possible side effects and drug interactions you can have with Zorvolex.

 

What Is Zorvolex? What Is It Used For?

Zorvolex pills are diclofenac capsules. Each capsule is 18 mm long and bisected into two colors (blue and light green). On the capsule is an imprint that varies depending on dosage (we’ll talk more about what dosages there are in the next section).

So what is this medication used for? Zorvolex is a low-dose prescription drug used to relieve mild to moderate acute pain or osteoarthritis pain. Like Advil and Aleve, Zorvolex is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), meaning it can reduce pain, aches, fevers, and swelling/inflammation.

Doctors often prescribe Zorvolex to patients who have osteoarthritis pain or pain from other short-term issues, such as muscle aches, backaches, menstrual cramps, sports injuries, and tooth pain.

 

Zorvolex Dosage and Contents

There are two dosages of Zorvolex: 18 mg and 35 mg. Both doses come as blue and green tablets; however, Zorvolex 18-mg tablets have the imprints “18mg” and “IP-203,” whereas Zorvolex 35-mg tablets have the imprints “35mg” and “IP-204.”

Diclofenac is the only active ingredient in Zorvolex. This substance is an NSAID and thus comes with the same risks as other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen. Diclofenac relieves pain by preventing the body from creating a substance that causes pain, inflammation, and fever.

If you are prescribed Zorvolex, your doctor will determine an appropriate dosage for you based on the type and severity of pain you have. As with any NSAID, you should take the lowest dose possible for the shortest amount of time needed to get better.

That said, there are some general guidelines when it comes to Zorvolex dosage. Patients who have osteoarthritis typically take three 35-mg capsules a day. For all other pain management, the recommended dosage is three 18- or 35-mg capsules a day. Remember, though, that it'll ultimately be up to your doctor to decide on an appropriate dosage for you.

 

body_pills_cups

Your doctor will choose an appropriate dosage for you based on the type and severity of your pain.

 

Zorvolex Brand Name and Manufacturers

Zorvolex is the brand name of a type of diclofenac capsule and is manufactured for and distributed by Iroko Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Other diclofenac medications are available under different brand names. Zipsor is the brand name for diclofenac potassium capsules used to relieve mild to moderate acute pain, whereas Cambia is the brand name for a diclofenac potassium powder (that becomes a solution) used to treat migraines in adults. Both Zipsor and Cambia are distributed by Depomed, Inc.

 

Zorvolex Side Effects

As with any NSAID, there’s the potential for side effects when taking Zorvolex. These effects can range from mild feelings of discomfort to severe allergic reactions. Always tell your doctor if you’re experiencing any side effects or if they don’t seem to be getting better.

According to the official Zorvolex website, commonly reported side effects include the following:

  • Swelling
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Gas
  • Itching
  • Heartburn

 

Occasionally, serious Zorvolex side effects or allergic reactions can occur. Such signs include the following:

  • Swelling of the face or throat
  • Trouble breathing
  • Heart failure
  • Kidney problems
  • Liver problems
  • Skin reactions indicating an allergy

 

If you experience any of these side effects, seek immediate medical attention.

 

body_medical_supplies

If you're having any serious side effects, see a doctor ASAP.

 

Drug Interactions to Avoid With Zorvolex

Certain drugs can interact poorly with Zorvolex, so be sure to tell your doctor about any medications you’re currently taking (including over-the-counter pills, vitamins, and supplements) before you start taking Zorvolex.

According to the National Institutes of Health, drugs and substances known to interact poorly with Zorvolex include the following:

  • Alcohol
  • Blood thinners such as warfarin
  • Aspirin
  • Beta-blockers
  • Loop diuretics
  • Lanoxin (digoxin)
  • Lithium
  • Trexall, Rasuvo, Rheumatrex (methotrexate)
  • Neoral, Sandimmune, Gengraf (cyclosporine)
  • Alimta (pemetrexed)
  • Other NSAIDs

 

Recap: What Is Zorvolex?

In conclusion, here are some of the essential points to remember about Zorvolex:

  • Zorvolex is a blue and light-green capsule imprinted with either “18mg/IP-203” or “35mg/IP-204.” It is used to treat mild to moderate acute pain and osteoarthritis pain. Available dosages are 18 mg and 35 mg (the dosage will be reflected on the capsule).
  • The main ingredient in Zorvolex is diclofenac, an NSAID that relieves pain by halting the body's production of a pain-causing substance.
  • Zorvolex is the brand name of a type of diclofenac capsule. There are also other brands of diclofenac medications, such as Zipsor and Cambia.
  • Like any NSAID, Zorvolex can cause mild to severe side effects, from nausea and vomiting to facial swelling and skin reactions. If your side effects are serious or if you are having an allergic reaction, see a doctor immediately.
  • Certain substances can interact poorly with Zorvolex, including alcohol, blood thinners, and other NSAIDs. Always tell your doctor what medications you’re on so that you can avoid any problematic interactions.

 

Have friends who also need help with test prep? Share this article!
Hannah Muniz
About the Author

Hannah received her MA in Japanese Studies from the University of Michigan and holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Southern California. From 2013 to 2015, she taught English in Japan via the JET Program. She is passionate about education, writing, and travel.



Get Free Guides to Boost Your SAT/ACT
100% Privacy. No spam ever.

Ask a Question Below

Have any questions about this article or other topics? Ask below and we'll reply!