SAT / ACT Prep Online Guides and Tips

Anna Aldric

Anna graduated from MIT where she honed her research interests in Earth Science and Social/Political Science. She has years of tutoring experience, loves watching students learn and grow, and strongly believes that education is the cornerstone of our society. She is passionate about science, books, and non-profit work.

Recent Posts

Average ACT Score for 2017, 2016, 2015, and Earlier Years

Posted by Anna Aldric | Aug 19, 2017 10:00:00 PM

ACT General Info


In recent years, more and more students have been taking the ACT than ever before. But what does this change in participation rate mean for the average ACT score?

As you'll learn in this article, while ACT scores have been fairly stable in the last few years, there have been some dips and peaks in scores in the last 25 years. Let’s take a look at what’s happening.

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Average SAT Scores Over Time: 2016, 2015, 2014, and Earlier

Posted by Anna Aldric | Feb 28, 2017 10:00:00 PM

SAT General Info

SAT scores for the past few years have shown a marked decline, particularly since 2006, which is attributed to various causes. Below, we provide you with some charts where you can see the average SAT trends from 1972 as well as the variation in SAT scores by ethnicity.

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ACT Score Chart: Raw Score Conversion to Scaled Score

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jul 11, 2015 2:57:06 PM

ACT General Info

Scaling a score converts the ACT raw score to a scaled score, which allows for comparisons between various test versions and all test takers. The raw score is the total number you have right in the section (whether math, science, reading or writing). A scaled score is what you get on each section of the ACT when you look up the raw score on the provided chart and figure out what your raw score means on the 1-36 scale. The composite score is then the average of four scaled scores, the highest possible composite is 36.

Every official ACT test has its own chart. This converts raw scores to scores on the 1-36 pt scale. If you want an estimate, you can use any available chart to grade your practice test. While it won't be accurate, because ACT varies how they scale the raw score according to each individual test, it can give you a good understanding of where you need improvement.

Let's take a look at an example scaling chart from ACT's site.  

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SAT Summer Prep Programs: Should You Join?

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jun 24, 2015 8:09:46 PM

SAT General Info

What are SAT Prep Summer Programs and should you use them?

There are a lot of variations in SAT summer programs and the hours of study they offer. Other than time, the greatest variation in SAT summer programs is through price. There are commercial and noncommerical options and they vary by price and hours offered, as well as the material used. No matter the course, a good program will offer at least once a week test.

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SAT Homeschool Code for Registration

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jun 13, 2015 10:35:00 AM

SAT Logistics

The Code

The universal SAT Home School Code, needed to register for the SAT and applicable anywhere in the USA, is 970000.

When you use this, it means that the score results will be sent directly to your home. Using this code simply indicates, for the sake of data gathering, that you are a home schooled student. Home schooled students, on average, score higher on the SAT than their public school counterparts. This code is CollegeBoard's way of tracking the results accurately. Also, the SAT compares you to the local average, but as a home schooled student, you won't provide an accurate representation of the local district scores.

However, if you want to, you can use the local high school's code as well.

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How to Register for the SAT as a Homeschooled Student

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jun 13, 2015 10:30:00 AM

SAT Logistics

What registration code to you use to register for the SAT as a homeschooled student, and what considerations should you remember? Read our guide to get the details.

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ACT Homeschool Code for Registration

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jun 13, 2015 10:30:00 AM

ACT Logistics

 

The Code

The universal ACT Home School Code, needed to register for the SAT and applicable anywhere in the USA, is 969-999.

When you use this, it means that the score results will be sent directly to your home. Using this code simply indicates, for the sake of data gathering, that you are a home schooled student. Home schooled students, on average, score higher on the SAT and the ACT than their public school counterparts. This code is ACT's way of tracking the results accurately. Also, the ACT compares you to the local average, but as a home schooled student, you won't provide an accurate representation of the local district scores.

However, if you want to, you can use the local high school's code as well.

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How to Register for the ACT as a Homeschooled Student

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jun 13, 2015 10:30:00 AM

ACT Logistics

How do homeschooled students register for the ACT, and what is the ACT homeschool code? What important considerations should you keep in mind? Find out here.

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Should You Really Join A SAT Summer Camp?

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jun 12, 2015 5:07:02 PM

SAT General Info

SAT Summer camps are cram school for the SATs. They try to bring together long hours and intensive sessions, promising students increases in their SAT scores or their money back. They range from online tutoring programs held over the summer (there are a lot of these) to day camps like the Elite SAT Boot Camp to month long residential camps where students live and breathe SAT prep and college admissions, like Columbia University's SummerFuel which utilizes the Princeton Review program. 

They all promise score increases, and some even guarantee them. But how do you know if you even need one? Keep reading to find out!

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How to Cancel Your SAT Scores

Posted by Anna Aldric | Jun 2, 2015 10:54:44 PM

SAT Logistics, SAT Strategies

What can you do if you took the SAT already but you decide you want to cancel your test scores?

First, stop and take a step back. Ask yourself if you’re sure. Once you cancel your test scores, there's no going back.

Second, figure out - can you still cancel your scores? CollegeBoard has a very strict deadline about this and if you miss that deadline, then they won't budge.

So what can you do? Well, I'm here to help you 1) assess whether you should cancel; 2) know what steps you need to take to cancel; and 3) know what to do if you miss the deadline to cancel, but still need to deal with a poor score.

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How to Cancel Your SAT Registration and Test

Posted by Anna Aldric | May 28, 2015 5:30:53 PM

SAT Logistics


You registered for the SAT, but as test day draws near, you find that you don’t want to take the test anymore! You may want to take the ACTs instead, or maybe you decided to opt out of the SAT altogether and apply to colleges that don’t require you to report SAT scores. But what can you do?

Well, first, don't panic!

We at PrepScholar noticed how hard it was to find this information online, so we put it all together for you in one place.

Here are some things you need to consider:

  1. Can you cancel the SAT test?
  2. Can you get your money back?
  3. Will this go on your permanent record?
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The 3 Types of SAT Reading Passages You Should Know

Posted by Anna Aldric | May 28, 2015 10:30:00 AM

SAT Reading

There are 3 types of SAT reading passages that you, as the test taker, need to be familiar with. The 3 types of passages mainly differ in length, but also somewhat in content. Therefore, the strategies for tackling them need to be different.

Below, we'll go over the different types of reading passages on the SAT and what you can expect from the questions that follow them. 

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